Sausage Plait

There are certain processes in the kitchen I find to be inherently therapeutic. Usually these are repetitive, methodical simple steps of a recipe that allow you to zone out Stirring a risotto is the most well-known – letting your mind wander as you add stock, stir and repeat for twenty minutes. Rolling meatballs, stamping out shortbread and dicing cucumber are more of my favourites. But the one I probably do the most would have to be plaiting pastry for this, one of my favourite go-to dinners.

Sausage Plait

Admittedly, plaiting the pastry here doesn’t take as long as stirring a whole risotto, but it is just as satisfying to do. So satisfying and simple in fact, that it became a very frequent staple of my family’s dinner rotation. Every time we make it, we end up making several more to last us the next few days. Eventually we have to go on a temporary Sausage Plait Ban to ensure we don’t have it for the sixth day in a row. This always lasts for a while, until there is some puff pastry and leftover sausages that need using up in the fridge…and then it is back to square one.

Sausage Plait

Serves 4

  • 450g sausage meat (or six sausages, removed from their skins
  • 1 apple, cored and diced
  • 1 onion, finely diced
  • 375g ready rolled puff pastry
  • 1 egg, beaten

Preheat the oven to 220’C.

Mix together the apple, onion and sausage meat. Unroll the pastry and lay on a baking tray. Shape the sausage meat into a long rectangle down the centre third. Use a sharp knife to cut the pastry on either side of the sausage meat into horizontal strips 1cm wide. Lay these over the sausage meat, one from each side at a time to form a plait style. Tuck the pastry at each end up over the sausage meat.

Brush the beaten egg all over the pastry. Bake for 25-30 minutes until the pastry is golden and crisp.

Sausage, kale and tomato casserole

Before university, I used to cook or bake at home on average once a week. This gave me plenty of time all week to decide what I was going to cook and wait for inspiration to strike. It might be a recipe I read, an advert that made me crave something, watching an episode of Everyday Mary Berry. Now that I cook for myself every day, its pretty easy to run out of inspiration. My ideas tend to come from trawling through BBC Good Food or Delicious magazine until I spot something to work from. Or, in the case of this casserole, my friend kept mentioning she was having sausages for her tea. This made me crave sausages, which made me look in my fridge and see what needed using up that I could cook with them. And so a sausage, kale and tomato casserole (with a few peas thrown in for good measure) was born.

Sausage and tomato casserole

Sausage, kale and tomato casserole

Serves 3

I prefer to roast my sausages and add them to the casserole at the end, rather than fry them in the casserole dish at the beginning. Frying them probably adds extra depth of flavour, but I can’t be faffed with turning a spitting sausage for 15 minutes and hoping it cooks all the way through and doesn’t just char on the outside. If you are a more patient soul than me, try frying them first, removing whilst you cook the onion and then returning to the pan before the tomatoes and chicken stock.

  • 6 sausages
  • 1 onion
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • 1 tin of tomatoes
  • 500ml chicken stock
  • 100g peas
  • 200g baby kale
  • sprinkling of thyme

Preheat the oven to 220’C. Line a baking tray with foil, add the sausages and roast for 20-25minutes until cooked through.

Meanwhile, finely dice the onion. Cook in a large saucepan in a glug of oil over a gentle heat until soft and beginning to caramelise. Crush the garlic clove, add to the pan and cook out for 1-2 minutes.

Add the tinned tomatoes, chicken stock, thyme and plenty of seasoning. Simmer for 10-15minutes until thickened and reduced slightly.

Add the peas, baby kale and cooked sausages. Stir to heat everything through. Serve and enjoy!

Ultimate Sausage Rolls

What is it about train stations and sausage rolls? I’ve been travelling between London and Cambridge a fair bit this week and every station I’ve passed through has been filled with the scent of freshly baked (or at least reheated) sausage rolls and pasties. Each time I was tempted, but I held out knowing that homemade would be far better.

Ultimate sausage rolls

When I pulled a tray of these out of my college oven, that familiar pastry aroma was back. This was swiftly followed by a girl who shares my kitchen commenting, ‘that’s a lot for one person’… clearly not understanding the joy of batch baking! One of these reheated in the oven, with a spoonful of baked beans and pile of steamed broccoli is going to my dinner for the next few days and I am more than okay with that.

Sausage rolls are so simple to make that a few easy touches can elevate them to the position of ‘ultimate’. Nigella seeds sprinkled on top add a touch of extra interest, using all-butter pastry ensures the best flakiness, interesting sausages will add more flavour than plain sausage meat with no extra effort from you. Trust me, these take 15 minutes to bake and will be far better than any station imitation.

Ultimate sausage rolls

Makes 4

  • 6 sausages (I used caramelised red onion ones)
  • 1 apple
  • 1 onion
  • 300g ready rolled puff pastry
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • sprinkling of nigella seeds

Preheat the oven to 200’C.

Use scissors to unpeel the sausages from their skins. Tip all the sausage meat into a bowl. Core and finely chop the apple – there is no need to peel it. Finely dice the onion. Add these to the sausage meat and mix everything together.

Unroll the puff pastry. Lay the sausage mixture down the centre of the pastry length ways. Lift the pastry around the meat and pinch together the join. Flip the long sausage roll over so this seam is on the base. Cut the roll into four and place on a lined baking sheet.

Brush each sausage roll with the beaten egg and top with a sprinkling of nigella seeds. Use a sharp knife to score three lines across the top of each one. Bake for 25 minutes until the pastry is risen, golden and crisp.

Tomato Meatball Soup

Just before I moved to Cambridge, two and a half long years ago now, multiple people warned me about ‘those east winds’. Relatives advised that I’d got used to raised London temperatures I was repeatedly asked if I owned a hat and enough warm jumpers.. You’d be forgiven for thinking I was heading to university in the Outer Hebrides as opposed to a mere two hour drive from South London.

tomato meatball soup

However, this is this the first term that has perhaps deserved those warnings. In case you hadn’t noticed, its January and its freezing. While Cambridge may still be lacking in snow, its doing its best with a steady stream of days where the temperature never breaks 3’C. And with weather like that, you need food like this.

tomato meatball soup

This soup has become one of my staple term time dishes. It is exactly what this weather calls for – it is hearty and comforting, yet doesn’t require any of the long slow cooking which is the hallmark of so many delicious winter stews but completely impractical when cooking on a college hob that turns off every 7 minutes for health and safety. It’s also handily versatile to suit however much time you have and whatever ingredients you need to use up – it can be made thicker and used as a pasta sauce, you can hide vegetables in it to fool yourself into getting your 5 a day, you can add chorizo for extra flavour or leave out the cream to make it lighter. Only one rule stays: eat this curled up in your cosiest cardigan, Netflix on, windows tightly closed and heating turned up.

Tomato Meatball Soup

Serves 2 generously

  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 1 clove of garlic, crushed
  • 4 sausages
  • 1 tin of chopped tomatoes
  • dried oregano
  • 1 chicken stock cube
  • 80ml double cream
  • handful of rocket

Heat a generous splash of oil in a medium saucepan. Add the finely chopped onion, and sweat for 5-10minutes on a medium heat until soft. Add the garlic and cook for 1-2 minutes more.

Use a sharp knife to remove each sausage from its skin, and divide each one into 4-5 meatballs. Add to the onions and turn up to a medium-high heat. Cook for 5 minutes until beginning to colour, stirring occasionally.

Add the chopped tomatoes. Put your stock cube in the empty tin and fill with boiling water, then tip into the saucepan. Add a generous shake of dried oregfano. Simmer for around 10minutes, until reduced and thickened slightly.

Stir in the cream and heat to warm through. Ladle into bowls and top with a handful of rocket. Curl up and enjoy!