Green vegeree

As I get older, I am definitely becoming a less fussy eater. Things I used to once hate have been tentatively embraced into my kitchen as I discover new ways of cooking that are too good to resist. Courgetti persuaded me to get on board with courgettes (although never as a permanent substitute for spaghetti, I’m not crazy). Shakshuka helped me embrace red peppers, squeaky texture and all. Certain foods remain strongly disliked – any conversion ideas welcome! – so blue cheese, walnuts and mushrooms are yet to make it on to any plate of mine. Smoky flavours are also hit and miss with me, hence why I had never made a traditional kedgeree with smoked haddock before. When I saw this idea in Waitrose magazine, swapping fish for veg, I was hooked!

vegeree

The basic idea of a kedgeree had certainly always appealed. Spicy rice, perfectly cooked oozing eggs – it all sounded like an ideal brunch or easy dinner. Like I say, this vegeree keeps all those vital elements whilst simply subbing in some hearty spinach instead of fish. This could also be adapted further by swapping the spinach for kale, cavolo nero or chard. I also loved the crunch of the salty cashew nuts on top, balancing the rich egg yolk perfectly. I’ll admit I often struggle to cook rice perfectly in this way and always find it hard to get dry, fluffy rice without burning the bottom or crunching on raw grains! For this recipe, I think it is okay to err on the more liquid side to prevent these issues and ensure fully cooked rice as there are enough other ingredients to balance a softer texture.

Green vegeree

Serves 3-4, recipe adapted from here.

  • Oil
  • 1 onion
  • 300g basmati rice
  • 2tsp curry powder
  • 500ml vegetable stock
  • 3 eggs
  • 2 large handfuls baby spinach
  • handful toasted cashew nuts

Add the onion and oil to a large pan and cook for 5-10 minutes until the onion starts to soften. Meanwhile, rinse the rice until the water runs clear.

Stir the curry powder into the onion, cook for 1 minute, then add the drained rice and stock. Season generously with salt and pepper. Bring to the boil, stir, then simmer gently, covered, for 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, simmer the eggs in a separate pan of boiling water for 6-7 minutes. Cool briefly in cold water, then peel and halve.

After 10 minutes, stir the spinach through the rice. Season generously, re-cover the pan, then turn off the heat and leave for 10 minutes. Fluff up with a fork and top with the halved eggs and cashew nuts.

Florentine Pizza

One of the headlines on the October issue of Cosmo recently read ‘Asos, Uber, Deliveroo – can you afford your lifestyle?’ Never has a headline felt so targeted towards me – I was pretty sure they’d had a sneaky look at my bank account. Deliveroo is dangerously addictive. You do it once as a treat, after a particularly stressful or exhausting day that leaves you craving Byron but with no desire to head back outside into a cold October night. After that first time, you remember how easy it was and how quickly the food came and it takes a lot of resistance to prevent it becoming a habit. The particularly tempting point for me came when a nearby Five Guys was added to the list of my local ordering options. But, as Cosmo was trying to remind me, takeaways are also annoyingly expensive and unhealthy, so it was time to try making my own.

Florentine pizza

My issue with cooking burgers at home is not only the struggle to get them to match up to a Five Guys offering, but also the inherent leftovers that come from inevitably buying a four pack of burger buns or large packet of mince. Pizza at home seemed like the way to go instead. This version is not completely cheat free, but it is so worth it and still feels more virtuous than a Dominos. My sneaky trick for making this extra delicious is using a garlic bread base instead of a plain pizza dough. These are usually nicer quality than plain bases from the supermarket anyway, but also that hidden layer of garlic butter adds so much more flavour. This makes more tomato sauce  than you need, but that just means there is enough for another non Deliveroo evening!

Florentine Pizza

Serves 1, generously!

  • 1 onion, finely diced
  • 1 clove of garlic
  • 400g tin of tomatoes
  • 1/2tsp dried thyme
  • 1 round garlic bread base
  • 60g of cheddar, grated
  • large handful of baby spinach
  • 1 egg
  • large handful of rocket

Add a glug of oil and the diced onion to a medium saucepan. Heat over a medium-low heat for 10-15 minutes until the onions are soft and beginning to caramelise. Add the garlic clove and cook out for 1-2 minutes. Add the tomatoes and thyme and simmer for 10-15 minutes until reduced slightly and thickened.

Preheat the oven to 220’C and place a baking tray on the middle shelf to heat through. Spread a few tablespoons of tomato sauce over the garlic bread. Top with the spinach and grated cheese. Bake for 8 minutes to allow the bread to begin to get crispy. Remove from the oven and carefully crack the egg into the centre of the pizza. Return to the oven for 3-5 minutes until the white is set but the yolk is still runny. Remove from the oven and top with rocket. Enjoy!

Spaghetti Carbonara

I’m approaching the revision period for my final exams. In doing so, I am discovering an intense ability to procrastinate. Turns out there are just questions in life that bother me more than  what was the cultural significance of Renaissance inventories. Like what the heck is going on with Brexit and Trump, sure, but also whether I’ll ever learn how to do perfect winged eye liner. Which shady character is the actual villain in series three of Broadchurch. The real life mystery of what exactly was going on with Hiddleswift last summer. How to make the perfect carbonara.

Spaghetti Carbonara

I love carbonara, but for years I have been making not-very-good ones and going along with it because it involved bacon, carbs and cheese and so could never be that bad. But then in New York last summer I had the ultimate fancy restaurant carbonara; one of those ones with an egg yolk on top to pierce and let flow down throughout the spaghetti. It showed me just how perfect a good carbonara could be and I knew I’d never be going to back to mildly scrambled versions. I would never claim this is a traditional version – I love the luxuriousness of the added cream too much – but it’s my favourite version and that is all I need. Maybe if I served it to Tom Hiddleston he’d explain everything?

Spaghetti Carbonara

Serves 1

  • 100g spaghetti
  • 3 rashers of streaky bacon
  • 2 egg yolks
  • splash of double cream
  • parmesan, to grate

Cook the spaghetti in a large saucepan of boiling water until al dente, about 8-10 minutes.

Meanwhile, fry the bacon until crisp. Drain on kitchen paper and snip into 2cm pieces.

Mix the egg yolks with the double cream in a mug. When the spaghetti is done, remove 2tbsp of the cooking water and mix in with the egg and cream.

Drain the spaghetti and return to the warm saucepan. Add the egg and bacon and stir to coat the pasta evenly and create a sauce. Pour into a bowl and top with plenty of grated parmesan.

Shakshuka

Let’s talk about what makes brunch so great. Aside from half a tin of fruit cocktail in primary school (fighting with my sister over the cherries) and a brief flirtation with brain-food muesli during exams, my mornings tend to be noticeably absent of food. Breakfast, with its connotations of 7am alarms, mainlining coffee and choosing between the early bus or an extra slice of toast, has never been something I’ve quite mastered. Brunch, on the other hand, is something I can get on board with.

Shakshuka

Lazy Sunday brunches can take many forms. Debriefing with friends about all the gossip from the night before. Refusing to move from bed, reading the papers and cuddling a reluctant kitten. Planning an elaborate day of plans before abandoning them all in favour of Netflix. Whatever your Sunday style, all these options can benefit from the inclusion of a big bowl of shakshuka. My version is super simple, with the chorizo being the secret ingredient that adds depth and flavour to your sauce without having to simmer it for hours. The feta adds salty tang, the mint gives freshness and of course, no breakfast is complete without the perfect insta-worthy oozing egg yolk. Make this next weekend – you can thank me later.

Shakshuka

Serves 2

  • 1 onion
  • 250g chopped chorizo
  • 1 large clove of garlic
  • 1 tin of chopped tomatoes
  • 2 eggs
  • 50g feta
  • small bunch of mint, finely chopped

Finely chop the onion and fry in a frying pan over a medium heat in a generous glug of olive oil until soft but not coloured. Add the chorizo and continue to cook until it goes crispy. Crush the garlic clove and add to the mixture and fry for a minute to cook out.

Add the tinned tomatoes and season generously with salt and pepper (you could also add a pinch of dried chilli flakes at this point if you like a bit of extra heat). Simmer for 5-10 minutes until thickened slightly.

Make two wells in the tomato mixture and crack an egg into each one. Cover with a lid (or baking tray if your frying pan doesn’t have one) and leave for 3-5 minutes until the white is cooked through but the yolk is still soft.

Remove from the heat. Crumble over the feta and sprinkle with the mint. Enjoy!