Rhubarb crumble ice cream

Surely the highlight of summer holidays has to be the opportunity for great ice cream every day. I remember all my recent holidays by the standard of the ice cream I had. In Malaga at Christmas I discovered the most perfect unadulterated raspberry sorbet. I returned so regularly for it throughout the week that I am sure the server started to recognise me. In April, I went to Florence with my best friend for just three days. Despite initial plans to try as many ice cream parlours and flavours as possible, one little ice cream shop opposite the Pitti Palace captured our hearts with it’s amazing caramel and white chocolate flavour. I know, it sounds sickly sweet, but I promise you it was balanced perfectly – smooth white chocolate ice cream, dark and salty caramel, a thick layer of dark chocolate fudge on top. A bold tangerine flavour discovered on an evening stroll was also deliciously memorable. I am headed to Rhodes and Symi in August and I’m already excited for more ice cream discoveries.

Rhubarb crumble ice cream

Perfect ice cream is too good to be restricted to holidays. Returning from travelling, I wanted to make a classic English flavour and considering my well documented rhubarb obsession, this seemed like a good place to start. I always make ice cream using the no-churn method – it is super easy and doesn’t require an ice cream maker, but still achieves really creamy and smooth results so you’d never know there wasn’t a custard base. Cooking the rhubarb and crumble adds a few more steps so having the ice cream base come together really quickly is extra helpful. The end result is the perfect treat on an English summer afternoon – tart swirls of pretty pink rhubarb, crunch from the crumble and extra flavour from the oats. Enjoy!

Rhubarb crumble ice cream

  • 400g rhubarb
  • 50g caster sugar
  • 140g plain flour
  • 10g butter
  • 100g light brown soft sugar
  • handful of rolled oats
  • 300ml double cream
  • 175ml condensed milk

Begin with the rhubarb. Preheat the oven to 180’C. Chop the rhubarb into 5cm lengths and place in a single layer on a baking tray. Sprinkle with the caster sugar. Roast in the oven for 15-20 minutes until the rhubarb is tender when pierced with a fork.

For the crumble, rub together the flour, butter and light brown sugar until just past breadcrumbs and beginning to form small lumps. Add the oats and stir through. Scatter in a single layer on a baking tray and bake above the rhubarb for 10-15 minutes, until golden and crisp. Remove from the oven and let cool.

Remove the rhubarb from the oven and tip into a food processor or blender, including all the juices. Blend to a smooth puree.

Next, whisk the double cream and condensed milk together until forming soft peaks. Stir through 2/3 of the rhubarb puree and 2/3 of the cooled crumble chunks. Scrape half the mixture into a Tupperware container. Spoon over half the remaining rhubarb puree, and half the remaining crumble. Swirl using the end of a spoon to create a ripple effect. Top with the rest of the ice cream mixture, puree and crumble. Finally, freeze for four hours or overnight until solid.

Blueberry Crumble Bars

Food photographs at this time of year are full of delicious ways to cook with the bounty of berries that summer provides. Particularly around the Fourth of July in America, my Instagram filled up with patriotically red strawberry galettes, blackberry pies and big sheet cakes with perfect berry specimens carefully arranged on top to depict the stars and stripes. Whilst these always look gorgeous, berries in my kitchen rarely last long enough to cook with. A punnet of strawberries on the counter will slowly be depleted throughout the day as I snack on a few every time I happen to walk past. Any stragglers at the end of the day simply get tipped into a bowl and smothered with cream to be eaten as dessert. Bowls of cherries disappear even faster, leaving just a tell-tale pile of stalks where they once were.

blueberry crumble bars

Blueberries, however, might be my one exception. Cheap enough that it doesn’t feel like sacrilege to bake with them, and not quite as sweetly addictive to eat by the greedy handful as the others, I knew that they were worth baking with. Plus these bars only need one simple punnet of blueberries as opposed to kilos of hulled and de-stemmed fruit, making this finger-staining recipe infinitely worth it.

Blueberry Crumble Bars

  • 150g plain flour
  • 75g caster sugar
  • 125g cold butter, cubed
  • 200g blueberries

Preheat the oven to 180’C. Line a 20cm square baking tray.

Mix the flour and caster sugar together in a medium bowl. Add the cubed butter. Rub together until it is the texture of fine breadcrumbs, then keep going for a few more minutes until it begins to come together in larger clumps.

Take 2/3 of this mixture and press into the base of the lined tin to form a shortbread. Scatter over the blueberries. Finally, sprinkle the remaining 1/3 of crumble mixture over the top.

Bake for 15-20minutes, until golden and crisp. Slice into squares.

Apple crumble

Apple crumble is pure nostalgia. The world could do with a little comfort food right now, and crumble is the dish to do this. For my family, crumble is what we miss whenever any of us go away. Whether it is me at university, my Dad for work, my sister since she’s moved out or my Mum going travelling – I think crumble symbolises home for all of us.

Apple crumble

Whether we’re going fancy with an amaretti laced plum version, or simple like this, you just can’t really go wrong with crumble. Tinned fruit work equally well if you’re in a pinch, but for my version I went as classic as you can get because I had some apples languishing in my cupboard that were beginning to get a bit tired and in desperate need of a covering of sugar and cream. I had such good intentions to share this, but somehow it was all gone within 24 hours…

Apple crumble

  • 75g plain flour
  • 20g brown sugar
  • 20g caster sugar, plus 1tbsp
  • 50g butter
  • 3 small apples

Preheat the oven to 180’C. Mix the flour and sugars (saving the extra 1tbsp of caster sugar) together. Cut the butter into small cubes, and rub it into the flour and sugar mixture until fully incorporated and sandy textured. I like to go a tiny bit further to get some larger chunks as well.

Peel, core and chop the apples into 2cm dice. Tip into the crumble dish and scatter with the reserved tbsp. of caster sugar. Scatter the crumble mixture evenly over the top.

Bake for 20-25mins until the crumble is golden and crisp. Serve with custard or extra thick double cream.